Layout Rebuild — Trackwork

Trackwork — the first part of our rebuild that will be visible when the layout is finished. The effort and care taken in the construction to this point are starting to pay dividends.

6/13/2012 — One tactic to help maintain quality in the layout construction is to require each worker to use the same construction techniques. This means we have a small clinic before each stage of construction to demonstrate the how the current task is to be done.

Here Jeff Martin (right) prepares a piece of roadbed while Larry Vogt (left) and Bill Krueger (background) watch.

Photo by Aline Bergemann

6/13/2012 — Larry Vogt (right) and Hugh Sherwood try their hand at laying the cork roadbed. The 'glue' is a high quality polymere calk spread in a thin layer on the back of the cork. The cork is then pressed into position and any bubbles are rolled out using the J roller in the forground..

Photo by Aline Bergemann

6/12/2012 — A view of the reverse loop and spiral climb to Summit at the west end of the main room. At this point, the centerline of the cork roadbed is within 1/16th of an inch of the final centerline.

Photo by Randy Stockberger

6/27/2012 — Larry Vogt cuts some roadbed.

Photo by Randy Stockberger

6/13/2012 — A wedge shapped piece of roadbed is cut using a template and used to fill the gap under a turnout where the rails diverge. One template can be used for either a left or right turnout by turning it over.

Photo by Aline Bergemann

6/13/2012 — The track is 'pre–fabbed' by soldering two sections of flex track together. By soldering at the workbench it is easier to get a quality solder joint and the six foot track sections can easily be bent to the layout curves.

Photo by Aline Bergemann

6/27/2012 — Aline Bergemann prefabs rail sections prior to installation.

Photo by Randy Stockberger

6/27/2012 — It's not all work, sometimes you have to pause and just watch the trains go by.

Photo by Randy Stockberger

6/27/2012 — Cliff Bergemann uses a notched trowel to spread the caulk onto the sub–roadbed. It is important to get a smooth uniform layer, any bumps and irregularities will telegraph thru the roadbed and make the trackwork uneven.

Photo by Randy Stockberger

6/27/2012 — Cliff Bergemann is positioning the cork in the fresh adhesive. The caulk dries quickly so the cork needs to be cut to size in advance.

Photo by Randy Stockberger

6/13/2012 — A view down the tracks shows a smooth curve.

Photo by Aline Bergemann

6/13/2012 — Another way to see if there any kinks in the trackwork is to hold a mirror on the rails, this makes it easier to see any irregularities.

Photo by Aline Bergemann

6/13/2012 — Jerry Boudreaux demonstrates how pressing the track into the caulk with a J–roller will set it's position. Pete Klingeman watches.

Photo by Aline Bergemann

6/13/2012 — Larry Vogt runs the test car over the new track. Watching are Scot Breeden (far left), Lyle Fries, Cliff Bergemann, Hugh Sherwood and Jerry Boudreaux on the far right.

Photo by Aline Bergemann

6/13/2012 — Bill McKinney has the honor of running the very first train on the new layout.

Kids of all ages — indeed.

Photo by Aline Bergemann

6/27/2012 — Hugh Sherwood gets surprised by the camera as he watches trains.

Photo by Randy Stockberger

6/13/2012 — The yardmaster needed to assign an engine for the trial run over the new trackwork. His selection of the 2-10-0 freight engine pleased many of the old guard.

Photo by Aline Bergemann

6/13/2012 — A closeup of the steamer as it rounds a bend. A smooth engine on smooth trackwork. Life Is Good!

Photo by Aline Bergemann

7/18/2012 — The yard areas are covered with 1/8" cork underlayment bought in bulk from a flooring contractor. The cork roadbed for the mainline is laid on top of the underlayment and yard tracks are laid directly on the underlayment without the cork roadbed. The transition requires a ramp between the mainline and yard tracks that decends about 1/4". This is created by using a sur–form tool and sanding blocks to taper the roadbed back for about 15".

When done correctly the couplers will maintain alignment as cars move thru the transition area.

Photo by Randy Stockberger

7/18/2012 — The transition from the cork roadbed to the underlayment must be planned carefully. If you have one leg of a turnout decending while the other leg remains elevated the turnout will twist vertically and Bad Things will happen.

Photo by Randy Stockberger

7/25/2012 — In this photo, the section on the right is built on the 1/8" cork underlayment while the section on the left is on the subroadbed. The back rail is the mainline and is elevated on the cork roadbed while the front track is a passing siding and is elevated on the left with strips of the cork underlayment.

This creates a step that must be eliminated. The mainline roadbed at the right rear will be sanded down to match up with the mainline roadbed at the left rear.

Photo by Randy Stockberger

7/25/2012 — Larry Vogt watches as Doug Taylor spreads adhesive on the bottom of the cork roadbed.

Photo by Randy Stockberger

7/25/2012 — Larry Vogt uses a J–roller to press the roadbed in place.

Photo by Randy Stockberger

7/25/2012 — All new track must be tested. David Quimby's SD70MAC moves thru the new trackwork showing that it is capable of supporting a heavy freight.

Photo by Randy Stockberger

8/1/2012 — Some trains are just fast. That needs testing too.

Train by Aline Bergemann, photo by Randy Stockberger

7/25/2012 — The track crews have been focusing on the mainline. There is still a lot of trackwork to do in the yards and sidings.

A view of work remaining in the Toledo yard.

Photo by Randy Stockberger

7/25/2012 — The scenery crew has been busy planning. Each of the white tags is a place name and represents a town or industry on the layout.

Notice also, there is now a backdrop on the lower level in this area.

Photo by Randy Stockberger

7/30/2012 — CSME engineering and tracklaying staff point fingers as Superintendent "Low Water" Smith arrives to see what all the fuss is about at milepost 392.6. Amidst the charges and countercharges related to the "Golden Spike" ceremony foreman Ben Dover observed that "this is a heckuva way to run a railroad". Dover's sister and chief accountant for the railroad Eilene Dover observed that after 390 miles the tracks were only off by about 5 feet. Work will continue throughout the night to insure proper alignment, grade and gauge for the official Golden Spike Ceremony scheduled for Wednesday evening at the club BBQ (August 1st.) Bring something to eat and something to run.

Photo by Jerry Boudreaux